Bees attracted to toxic pesticides

Bees attracted to toxic pesticides

New studies show that bees prefer to forage on untreated or pesticide-laced food sources. Over time, individual bees who have visited treated flowers develop a preference for the taste. This creates a growing risk to their long-term health and colony success....
More bees, please!

More bees, please!

A recent study involving 48 farms in two states shows that an abundance of wild bees means a lot of pollination. A Rutgers University study published in Science concludes that over a larger area, a variety of bee species is necessary in pollination. This study is the...
More bees, please!

New Proposed Beekeeping Regulations

A story published on www.northjersey.com calls for action against newly proposed beekeeping regulations.  Hobby beekeepers say the regulations would discourage beginning beekeepers. The proposed regulations restrict hives in residential lots less than one-quarter acre...
More bees, please!

Radar reveals how bees develop routes

A recent study conducted in London tackles the “traveling salesman problem” of foraging bees.  The “traveling salesman problem” is the travelling distance between multiple destinations and a home base. The challenge is to find a route that...